John Henry; tracking down a Negro legend

by Guy Benton Johnson

Publisher: AMS Press in New York

Written in English
Published: Pages: 155 Downloads: 860
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Places:

  • United States

Subjects:

  • John Henry (Legendary character),
  • African Americans -- Music -- History and criticism.,
  • Folk music -- United States -- History and criticism.,
  • Folk songs, English -- United States -- History and criticism.,
  • African American men in literature.,
  • African American men -- Folklore.

Edition Notes

Statementby Guy B. Johnson.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsPS461.J6 J6 1969
The Physical Object
Pagination155 p.
Number of Pages155
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL5216119M
LC Control Number75080720

Guy Benton Johnson is the author of John Henry ( avg rating, 2 ratings, 0 reviews), The Veiled Garvey ( avg rating, 19 ratings, 2 reviews, publis 3/5(2).   John Henry was an African American who was born with a hammer in his hand. Strong, resourceful, John Henry becomes king of the railroad camps, known far and wide for his prowess with a hammer. He. John Henry is one of the most famous American tall tales. Readers will be introduced to John Henry, who grew up as a slave and went on to be known as the fastest and strongest steel driver on the railroad. The story can serve as an engaging introduction to the . John Henry: Tracking Down a Negro Legend () Folk Culture on St. Helena Island, South Carolina () Education, Segregation, and Race Relations () Negro Racial Movements and Leadership in the United States () Personality in a White-Indian-Negro .

The story of John Henry as song, as legend, as tourist attraction is the narrative thread. The focus is on John Henry Days, a festival in West Virginia that has been created to celebrate John Henry and the issuing of a stamp of him, but more importantly to bring tourists to two small and economically struggling towns/5.   50+ videos Play all Mix - Johnny Cash-Legend of John Henry's Hammer YouTube Johnny Cash Greatest Hits - Best Songs Of Johnny Cash new - Duration: Best Mix of Popular Songs , views.   Buy a cheap copy of Steel Drivin' Man: John Henry: the book by Scott Reynolds Nelson. The ballad "John Henry" is the most recorded folk song in American history and John Henry--the mighty railroad man who could blast through rock faster than a steam Free shipping over $Cited by: Early life. John Henry Faulk was born in Austin, Texas to Methodist parents Henry Faulk and his wife Martha Miner Faulk. John Henry had four siblings. Faulk spent his childhood years in Austin in the noted Victorian house Green Pastures.A journalist acquaintance from Austin has written that the two of them came from "extremely similar family backgrounds -- the old Southern Alma mater: University of Texas at Austin.

John Henry; tracking down a Negro legend by Guy Benton Johnson Download PDF EPUB FB2

Guy B. Johnson's book John Henry: Tracking Down a Negro Legend was the first book to be published which was specifically about John Henry, the legendary steel driver celebrated in song and story by black and white laborers and musicians since the late nineteenth century.5/5(1).

John Henry Tracking Down a Negro Legend by Johnson, Guy B. and a great selection of related books, art and collectibles available now at John Henry Tracking Down a Negro Legend by Johnson Guy B - AbeBooks.

In-depth study of the historical antecedents of the John Henry myth, who was in some ways the black Southern equivalent of the Paul Bunyan myth. Johnson was a white scholar who collaborated with Howard Odum on several books John Henry; tracking down a Negro legend book Negro folk music, and with W.E.B.

Du Bois on a Negro Encyclopedia that never came to complete fruition. COVID Resources. Reliable information about the coronavirus (COVID) is available from the World Health Organization (current situation, international travel).Numerous and frequently-updated resource results are available from this ’s WebJunction has pulled together information and resources to assist library staff as they consider how to handle.

John Henry Tracking Down A Negro Legend. Author: Johnson, Guy B. Title: John Henry Tracking Down A Negro Legend Publication: Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, Edition: First Edition Description: The University of North Carolina Social Studies Series Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, First Edition.

Rating: % positive. Get this from a library. John Henry: tracking down a Negro legend. [Guy Benton Johnson]. his book, John Henry: Tracking Down a Negro Legend. In his treatise, Johnson sought to In his treatise, Johnson sought to establish a historical basis for “the Negro’s greatest folk character” (Johnson, 1).File Size: KB.

John Henry; tracking down a negro legend, By Guy Benton Johnson. Abstract. Mode of access: Internet Topics: African Americans, John Henry (Legendary character) Publisher: Chapel Hill, The University of North Carolina press, Year: OAI identifier: oai::MIU Author: Guy Benton Johnson.

InDr. Johnson published John Henry Tracking Down a Negro Legend. InDr. Chappell published John Henry a Folklore Study. The men they interviewed provided testimonies that were at times contradictory. The Blankenship broadside was owned by Mrs. Lynn of Rome, Georgia. She sent it to Guy B. Johnson, author of John Henry: Tracking Down a Negro Legend 11 when he was advertising for information about John Henry.

4 7/8 x 8 1/2", it contains 12 verses and is signed in type, "W. Blankenship.". According to legend, John Henry's prowess as a steel-driver was measured in a race against a steam-powered rock drilling machine, a race that he won only to die in victory with hammer in hand as his heart gave out from s locations, including Big Bend Tunnel in West Virginia, Lewis Tunnel in Virginia, and Coosa Mountain Tunnel in Alabama, have been.

Guy B. Johnson's book John Henry: Tracking Down a Negro Legend was the first book to be published which was specifically about John Henry, the legendary steel driver celebrated in song and story by black and white laborers and musicians since the late nineteenth century.5/5.

Much of the John Henry story can be traced to the author Guy Johnson, who published a book called John Henry: Tracking Down a Negro Legend in Johnson obtained lyrics to the song that he estimated were written down in This early version was called "John Henry, Steel Driving Man" and contained 12 stanzas.

This brings us to the first book-length study of John Henry and the John Henry legend, Guy B. Johnson's John Henry: Tracking Down a Negro Legend. John Henry: Tracking Down a Negro Legend by Guy B. Johnson. (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, ).

A little hard to find, this book should be available at most major libraries. Johnson, a faculty member at the Institute for Research in Social Science at UNC, made the first concerted attempt to track down the origins of the.

Johnson, Guy B. "John Henry: Tracking Down a Negro Legend." University of North Carolina, In the 's, two professors gathered oral histories from. Scott Reynolds Nelson, in Steel Drivin' Man: John Henry, the Untold Story of an American Legend (), searched for prisoners called John Henry, found one who worked on the Chesapeake and Ohio Railroad, and selected the Lewis Tunnel in Virginia, completed inas a more likely site, as steam-powered drills are known to have been used there along side men doing the same job.

John Henry: An American Legend is a children's picture book written and illustrated by Ezra Jack Keats, which tells a story about John Henry, who was born with a hammer in his hand and was inspired by the American folk hero of the same name.

The text is 4/5. This is my rendition of this classic folk song. I based it off Dave van Ronk's version, which I believe was based on Woodie Gurthie's version. It's telling the story of John Henry, a big man who. Johnson, G.B. John Henry: Tracking Down a Negro Legend. Chapel Hill, NC: University of North Carolina Press.

Vintage Books. Google Scholar. Lopes, A.A., F.K. Port, S.A. James, and L. Agodoa The Excess Risk of Treated End-Stage Renal Disease in Blacks in the United States.

Journal of the American Society of Nephrology – In tracking down information on Nineteenth Century railroad workers and an imprisoned black man named John Henry -- a man who had been rented out by a warden during Reconstruction as part of a work crew -- Professor Nelson has provided readers an exceptional and fascinating look at how historians create the written record of the past/5(12).

Johnson, Guy B. John Henry: Tracking Down a Negro York: AMS Press, The first two major scholarly books on the topic were Guy B. Johnson, John Henry: Tracking Down a Negro Legend,and Louis Chappell, John Henry: A Folk-Lore Study, Both were attempts to find "the real John Henry.".

The John Henry story, known throughout the world and West Virginia’s best-known folktale, was also taken up by Guy B. Johnson, whose John Henry: Tracking Down a Negro Legend appeared in Between andChappell pioneered field recording in West Virginia in a concerted effort to collect folksongs and fiddle music throughout the state.

Johnson’s work was the first published book-length study of John Henry and the John Henry legend. Johnson spent four days in Talcott, WV in June interviewing still-living men who were likely to have seen the event with their own eyes.

C.S. (Neal) Miller told him “Now some people say John Henry died because of this test. He appears in Roark Bradford’s novel John Henry, as well as in numerous American ballads that were collected by Guy B. Johnson in John Henry: Tracking Down a Negro Legend.

Guy Johnson’s research indicated that the earliest John Henry ballads originated in the oral tradition of hammer songs in the s and evolved over time into the ballads. Abstract. A community probability sample of southern, working-class, black men (N=)between 17 and 60 years of age was administered a scale to measure the degree to which they felt they could control their environment through hard work and the legend of John Henry—the famous, black steeldriver of American folklore—can be understood as a cultural Cited by: Myths, Legends, and Folklore of African-Americans Good reads for discovering the weird and wonderful world African-Americans made.

No books solely on folksongs. With regard to Julius Lester's John Henry, it is in particular illustrator Jerry Pinkney's Caldecott Honour winning accompanying illustrations which I have always found (and ever since first reading the book as a library copy a couple of years ago) very much personally and visually impressive (expressive).For although Pinkney's pictorial renderings are /5.

It was obtained in by Dr. Guy B. Johnson from Mrs. C.L. Lynn of Rome, Georgia, who said ‘It is very old and has been in our family for many years’. This copy appears in Dr. Johnson’s book, John Henry: Tracking Down a Negro Legend, which was published by the University of North Carolina Press in.

John Henry, an American Legend is a children's picture book by American author and illustrator Ezra Jack Keats In this book, it shows that John Henry, a hard working miner tries to beat the steam drill. He used a pound hammer against a steam drill. Whoever won would get dollars and new clothes.

In the end John Henry won the competition, but he also broke Author: Ezra Jack Keats. It was obtained in by Dr. Guy B. Johnson from Mrs. C.L. Lynn of Rome, Georgia, who said ‘It is very old and has been in our family for many years’.

This copy appears in Dr. Johnson’s book, John Henry: Tracking Down a Negro Legend, which was published by the University of North Carolina Press in Johnson, Guy Benton. John Henry: Tracking Down a Negro Legend.

Levine, Lawrence. “The Hero vs. Society: John Henry to Joe Louis.” In Black Culture and Black Consciousness. Oxford University Press, Lomax, Alan. The Folk Songs of North America. Doubleday, Nelson, Scott Reynolds. Steel Drivin’ Man: John Henry: The Untold.